Mabel Poulton: British silent cinema’s cockney darling

Mabel Poulton in The Alley Cat

Mabel Poulton in The Alley Cat

Mabel Poulton, star of The Alley Cat, which we are showing at the 20th British Silent Film Festival, was one of the most popular, and sadly one of the swiftest forgotten actresses of the 1920s. She was a waif-like star, who excelled in romantic and tragic roles, and ultimately became a victim of the vagaries of the film industry.

Her start in the cinema was hardly glamorous, but it did rely on her natural resemblance to the American star Lillian Gish. Poulton was working as a typist at the Alhambra Theatre in Leicester Square, but studying acting in her spare time, when her manager asked her: “How would you like to die three times a day?” He required her to wear a kimono and enact her demise as a dramatic prologue to screenings of Broken Blossoms, DW Griffith’s east-end drama. Continue reading

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Silent René Clair: The Phantom of the Moulin Rouge (1925)

Le Fantôme du Moulin-Rouge (1925)

Le Fantôme du Moulin-Rouge (1925)

René Clair was one of France’s most celebrated auteur directors, who made great films in both the silent and sound eras and on each side of the Atlantic. We’re thrilled that our festival will host the UK premiere of Lobster Films’ new restoration of his first feature film, Le fantôme du Moulin-Rouge (The Phantom of the Moulin Rouge, 1925). And we’re even more excited to say that this screening will be accompanied by two of our favourite musicians, multi-instrumentalist Stephen Horne and harpist Elizabeth-Jane Baldry.

Although Clair is credited, quite rightly, with one of the most sophisticated transitions to the talking pictures with the eloquent sound design of Sous les Toits de Paris (Under the Roofs of Paris, 1930), his silent work is particularly fascinating and has been overlooked by too many people. His silent work combines the avant-garde, the comic and the fantastical to make films that are filled with beauty and wonder, as well as humour. Continue reading

20th British Silent Film Festival – at-a-glance timetable

Sången om den Eldröda Blomman (Song of the Scarlet Flower, 1919)

Song of the Scarlet Flower (1919)

Wednesday 11 September

Leicester Museum and Art Gallery

7. 30pm

From Morn to Midnight (Von morgens bis mitternachts)

Thursday 12 September

10am – 11.15am

From Music Hall to Cinematograph

The films, life and work of Alf Collins and the Collins’ Family

Presented by Ray and Sylvia Spare

11.45am – 12.35pm

ABC in Sound

Presented by Bryony Dixon

1.30pm – 2.30pm

The Oyster Princess (Die Austernprinzessin)

Introduced by Margaret Deriaz

3.15pm – 3.50pm

Peace on the Western Front

Introduced by Toby Haggith, Senior Curator from the Imperial War Museum.

4.15pm – 5.45pm

Comradeship

Introduced by Lucie Dutton.

6.15pm – 7.45pm

The Song of the Scarlet Flower (Sången om den eldröda blomman)

9.15pm – 10.30pm

The Alley Cat

Spring Awakening (1929)

Spring Awakening (1929)

Friday 13 September

9am – 10.05am

The City of Song

Introduced by Geoff Brown

10.45pm – 12.15pm

British silent rarities from the Archive Film Agency

Introduced by Laraine Porter

1.15pm – 2.45pm

The Silver Lining

3.15pm – 4.35pm

Tons of Money

5.15pm – 6.50pm

Spring Awakening (Frühlingserwachen)

Introduced by Michael Eaton

8.15pm -10.15pm

The Struggle for the Matterhorn (Der Kampf ums Matterhorn)

Introduced by Miranda Gower-Qian

Tell Me Tonight (1932)

Tell Me Tonight (1932)

Saturday 14 September

9am – 10.30am

Tell Me Tonight

Introduced by Geoff Brown

11am -12.20pm

The Runaway Princess

Introduced by Laraine Porter

11am – 12.30pm

Leicester Museum and Art Gallery

Neil Brand’s Laurel and Hardy Show, live music

1.45pm – 2.45pm

The Boer War on Screen

Presented by Bryony Dixon and Matt Lee

3.15pm – 4.45pm

The Midnight Girl

Introduced by Michelle Facey

Plus

Toni

5.30pm – 6.50pm

The Phantom of the Moulin Rouge (Le fantôme du Moulin Rouge)

8pm – 9.20pm

Tesha

Feeding the Pigeons in St Mark's Square

Feeding the Pigeons in St Mark’s Square

Sunday 15 September

9am – 10.12pm

Secret Film

Introduced by Geoff Brown.

10.45pm – 12.05pm

A slow journey across Europe – A programme of early travelogues

Presented by Bryony Dixon

12.30pm – 1.15pm

‘An Appreciation of Film’: The Leicester Film Society in the 1930s

Presented by Sue Porter

2.15pm – 3.15pm

The Puppet Man

4pm5.30pm

Leicester Museum and Art Gallery

Screening the Victorians

Presented by Bryony Dixon

 

 

From Morn to Midnight: extreme German Expressionism

Von Morgens bis Mitternachts (From Morn until Midnight, 1920)

Von Morgens bis Mitternachts (From Morn to Midnight, 1920)

This year, the British Silent Film Festival is commemorating the anniversary of the birth of the Weimar Republic. This means we will be looking both at some acclaimed German films of the 1920s, but also international co-productions and those British films that betray the clear influence of Weimar cinema. We are also exploring the origins of the horror genre, as the  nights draw in. So there is no finer way to begin our festival than with an influential and bold classic of German Expressionist cinema. We want to create the perfect atmosphere too, so our opening night movie will screen at the New Walk Museum and Art Gallery in Leicester, which is home to an internationally acclaimed collection of Expressionist art.

The film we are screening is Karlheinz Martin’s From Morn to Midnight (1920) – a bold  film that epitomises the styles and concerns of German Expressionism. The Expressionist movement moved from fine art – distorted perspectives and artificiality combine with thick, obvious brush strokes to create a visual representation not of naturalism but of the artist’s innermost psychological turmoil – to the theatre . From Morn to Midnight was made very shortly after the famous The Cabinet of Dr Caligari (1919), which has widely been celebrated as the first true Expressionist film. It shares with that film a sense of foreboding and introspection, a feeling that the outside world is filled with danger – and of course a heavily stylised, theatrical production design.

From morn tomidnight4

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